How Much Did It Cost To Stand In The Yard At The Globe?

How much did poor people pay to watch a play?

They were too poor to pay to be able to sit on one of the three levels of the theatre.

If they paid one penny, they could stand in “the pit”, also called “the yard”, just below the stage, to watch the play.

Standing in the pit was uncomfortable, and people were usually packed in tightly..

Where did the rich and poor sit in the Globe Theatre?

The upper class theatre goers of the Globe Theatre would sit in a section higher called the heavens on cushions. Rich nobles would even pay to sit on the actual stage itself. Since plays ran a very long time, people would get rowdy. They would talk, throw vegetables, and even jump up on the stage.

What was it like to attend the globe Theatre?

The rowdy pit was filled with commoners watching and loudly applauding the plays. Fights often broke out; thievery and prostitution were common in the lowest level. The audience must have loved the plays to endure the crowded, smelly, uncomfortable conditions for up to three hours at a time.

Who was the audience of the Globe Theatre?

The Globe Theater audiences The Elizabethan general public (the Commoners) referred to as groundlings would pay 1 penny to stand in the ‘Pit’ of the Globe Theater. The gentry would pay to sit in the galleries often using cushions for comfort!

How much did poor Victorians get paid?

Conductors were allowed to keep four shillings a day out of the fares they collected, and drivers could count on 34 shillings a week, for a working day beginning at 7.45 and ending often past midnight. A labourer’s average wage was between 20 and 30 shillings a week in London, probably less in the provinces.

Do rich people watch TV?

They don’t watch TV. Similarly, only 6% of the wealthy watch reality shows, compared to 78% of the poor. “The common variable among the wealthy is how they make productive use of their time,” explains Corley. “They wealthy are not avoiding watching TV because they have some superior human discipline or willpower.

Why is the Globe called the Globe?

By May 1599, the new theatre was ready to be opened. Burbage named it the Globe after the figure of Hercules carrying the globe on his back – for in like manner the actors carried the Globe’s framework on their backs across the Thames.

What destroyed the Globe Theater?

On 29 June 1613, the Globe Theatre went up in flames during a performance of Henry VIII. A theatrical cannon, set off during the performance, misfired, igniting the wooden beams and thatching.

What kind of audience did the Globe Theatre attract?

The Elizabethan general public (the Commoners) referred to as groundlings would pay 1 penny to stand in the ‘Pit’ of the Globe Theater. The gentry would pay to sit in the galleries often using cushions for comfort. Rich nobles could watch the play from a chair set on the side of the Globe stage itself.

What did the audience do if they didn’t like a performance?

If they didn’t like the play, the audience threw them at the actors! This is where our idea of throwing tomatoes comes from – but ‘love-apples’, as they were known, come from South America and they weren’t a common food at the time. The groundlings were also called ‘stinkards’ in the summer – for obvious reasons!