Quick Answer: Is It Might Be Or May Be?

When to use may be or might be?

‘may’ and ‘might’Level: beginner.We can use may not to refuse permission or to say that someone does not have permission, but it is formal and emphatic:We use might when we are not sure about something in the present or future:Level: intermediate.We use may have and might have to make guesses about the past:Level: beginner.More items….

What does MAY HAVE mean?

You use might or may with have to say that it is possible that something happened in the past, but you do not know whether it happened or not.

How do you use had better in a sentence?

Had better is always followed by a verb in the infinitive without ‘to’: You had better BE on time. You must or should be on time. Had better is ALWAYS formed from the auxiliary verb ‘have’ in the past simple (‘has better’ or ‘will have better’ do not exist!).

How do you use might be in a sentence?

Might sentence examplesIt might have done damage inside. … If you could see a way it might be possible, then it must be possible. … We might have done something to help you. … This might be the most difficult decision she would ever make. … Either situation might be the case. … No one knows what the mother might do.More items…

Is it May you or can you?

May is the more formal word, and if you are at all concerned about being tut-tutted, a safe choice. Can is now the verb of choice for ability, and both can and may are still used in the “possibility” sense.

How do you use may and might in a sentence?

Example Sentences using MAY and MIGHTI might watch another episode.You may bring a partner to our event.He may have been.She might tell us what happened if we ask her.It might rain this afternoon.We may be invited but I’m not sure.They might go to the beach this weekend.

When may be is used?

In the phrase may be /meɪ bi:/ may is a modal verb and be is a main or auxiliary verb. Here may and be are two separate words, whereas maybe is one word: There may be a train at 10.00am.

Can we use might for future?

There is no past tense but might have, followed by a past participle, is used for talking about past possibilities: The explosion might have been caused by a gas leak. … There is no future tense, but might is used for talking about future possibilities: It might rain tomorrow.

What does might could mean?

There’s an expression from the Southern United States that has always bugged me and it is “might could” which means may be willing and/or able to do something in the future. It is used like this: “Are you going to do it?” “I’m not sure but I might could.”

Could be vs might be?

We use could to talk about possible future happenings. Might is used to express the speaker’s uncertainty about the possibility of the occurrence of the main verb.

Where is might used?

“Might” is a modal verb most commonly used to express possibility. It is also often used in conditional sentences. English speakers can also use “might” to make suggestions or requests, although this is less common in American English.

Can and could grammar?

Can, like could and would, is used to ask a polite question, but can is only used to ask permission to do or say something (“Can I borrow your car?” “Can I get you something to drink?”). Could is the past tense of can, but it also has uses apart from that–and that is where the confusion lies.

Is it I may or I might?

Past Tense. The grammatical distinction between the two words is tense-based—may is the present tense and might the past tense. Incorrect usage in this context is fairly rare because a native speaker would catch the error almost immediately: Incorrect usage: I thought I may go to the game.

Could might MAY possibility?

Possibility. We use may, might and could to say that something is possible, but not certain: They may come by car. (= Maybe they will come by car.)