Quick Answer: What’S The Difference Between Have You And Did You?

What is difference between have and did?

The question was – What’s the difference between “did” and “have done”.

“Did” is the past tense of “do.” It says something is past, period.

“Have done” is the past participle..

Where do we use did and have?

Have – is used when time isn’t irrelevant, it’s the ACTION that matters, and the action isn’t neccessarily completed. Did – is used when time is relevant and the action is completed. Thank you once again! Last edited by PebblePoet; 11-May-2005 at 10:55.

Can we use did with had?

Yes we can use both of them in a sentence. As you know had is the past participle form and did is the simple past. So normally had is used in past perfect or continious. Exg- I had completed that work.

Did she have or have?

Note that the infinitive form of every verb except BE looks the same as the ordinary present form, so it’s easy to become confused about this. ‘has’ is 3rd-person PRESENT tense only. ‘have’ is 3rd-person PAST tense. DID is PAST tense, hence use have.

Did you have or had?

“Had” is not the appropriate tense to use in this case: you must use “have”. The grammatically correct form of your sentence would be “Did you already have the opportunity to do something?”

What have you done meaning?

Have you done = have you started and completed something.

What have you did or done?

In grammatical terms, “What have you done?” is present perfect; “What did you do?” is past simple. You are right in a way – in some contexts they are interchangeable and there isn’t a difference, but as always, context is everything.

What are the five sentences?

Study the following sentences.They have received the parcel. … She has returned. ( … You have done a good job. ( … They have accepted the offer. ( … She has declined the offer. ( … The offer has been declined by her. ( … She has been reprimanded. (

When to Use Do you and have you?

Thanks a lot. Thanks all ! “Have you” is used with the perfect tense. “Have you eaten yet?” “Have you got a pen I can borrow?” “Do you have” is used when “have” isn’t part of the perfect tense.

How do you use had?

HADAs a Transitive Verb: I had two slices of cake, while you had three cups of tea. … As an Auxiliary Verb for the Past Perfect Tense (Subject + HAD + Past Participle verb) By the time he realized his mistake, she had already gone. … As an Auxiliary Verb for the Past Perfect-Progressive Tense (Subject + HAD + Been + Verb-ing)

What did you have or had for dinner?

They are largely interchangeable. ‘What did you have…’ can be used further from the event (eating dinner) than ‘what have you had…’ which needs to be asked reasonably soon after the meal.

What I have done was or is?

The tense in the first part of the sentence (“have done”) is the present perfect (a present tense), so it’s more common to use “is.” However, the present perfect is used to indicate the past in this case, so I understand where your confusion comes from.

Did he give or gave?

The past tense of give is gave. When you add what is necessary for the question or the negative, the base form of the verb is used. I gave her a present. … Did you give her a present?

Has done or had done?

Have done — Have done is a present perfect tense, generally it is used when the action is completed recently/just now. Had done– Had done is a past perfect tense, generally refers to something which happened earlier in the past, before another action also occured in the past.

How do you use have had in one sentence?

We use have had in the present perfect when the main verb is also “have”:I’m not feeling well. I have had a headache all day.She has had three children in the past five years.We have had some problems with our computer systems recently.He has had two surgeries on his back.

How you have been doing?

“How have you been?” is a common question from native English speakers. It’s asking what you have been up to and how life has been for you from from a certain point in time. Perhaps you’re being asked how you’ve been doing since the last time you saw each other.