What Is Stereotype Threat And How Might It Influence Test Scores?

How does stereotype threat influence the results of a test?

For example, stereotype threat has been shown to disrupt working memory and executive function, increase arousal, increase self-consciousness about one’s performance, and cause individuals to try to suppress negative thoughts as well as negative emotions such as anxiety..

What are the consequences of stereotype threat?

Researchers have shown that stereotype threat saps working memory capacity. Stereotype threat can also impair executive functions by increasing the amount of stress children experience in the classroom. When the classroom climate heightens stereotype threat, the stress response can become chronic for some students.

What are the risks of cultural stereotyping on students?

Many ethnic stereotypes are negative and thus have an extensive effect on students’ academic efficacy. Therefore, a result of this stereotype threat is that negative stereotypes can become internalized and can “cause rejection of one’s own group, even of oneself” (Steele 1997, p. 621).

What is stereotype threat Miller?

Stereotype threat refers to being at risk of confirming, as a self-characteristic, a negative stereotype about one’s social group (Steele & Aronson, 1995).

What is the meaning of stereotype threat?

Definition. Stereotype threat is defined as a “socially premised psychological threat that arises when one is in a situation or doing something for which a negative stereotype about one’s group applies” (Steele & Aronson, 1995).

How do you combat stereotype threats?

Empirically Validated Strategies to Reduce Stereotype Threat.Remove Cues That Trigger Worries About Stereotypes.Convey That Diversity is Valued.Create a Critical Mass.Create Fair Tests, Present Them as Fair and as Serving a Learning Purpose.Value Students’ Individuality.Improve Cross-Group Interactions.More items…

How can we avoid stereotyping?

How to Recognize, Avoid, and Stop Stereotype Threat in Your Class this School YearCheck YOUR bias at the door. … Create a welcoming environment free from bias in your discipline. … Be diverse in what you teach and read. … Honor multiple perspectives in your classroom. … Have courageous conversations.

What is cultural stereotyping?

Cultural/national stereotypes are both descriptive and prescriptive in nature: they are perceivers’ shared beliefs about the characteristics of the target group and at the same time they also function as social expectations.

What effect does the growth mindset have on stereotype threat?

Students with a “growth mindset” believe that intelligence is malleable, learning is often effortful, and failure is a natural (and perhaps necessary) part of personal and academic growth. When students with a growth mindset fail, it does not threaten their sense of identity, so they are able to move on and persist.

Who gave definition of stereotype threat?

The term “stereotype threat” was coined by Claude Steele and Joshua Aronson in their (1995) paper: “Stereotype threat and the intellectual test performance of African Americans”. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 69 (5): 797–811.

How do stereotypical beliefs develop?

Some psychologists believe that although stereotypes can be absorbed at any age, stereotypes are usually acquired in early childhood under the influence of parents, teachers, peers, and the media. If stereotypes are defined by social values, then stereotypes only change as per changes in social values.

What is a good example of a stereotype?

Positive examples of stereotypes include judges (the phrase “sober as a judge” would suggest this is a stereotype with a very respectable set of characteristics), overweight people (who are often seen as “jolly”) and television newsreaders (usually seen as highly dependable, respectable and impartial).

What is a stereotype lift?

Stereotype lift is the performance boost caused by the awareness that an outgroup is negatively stereotyped. People may benefit from stereotype lift when the ability or worth of an outgroup is explicitly called into question.

How does stereotyping affect communication?

3.1 Stereotypes may lead ineffective communication when we communicate with strangers. Our stereotypes tend to be activated automatically when we categorize strangers and when we are not communicating mindfully (see von Hippel, Sekaquaptewa, & Vargas, 1995).

What is stereotype threat in education?

Stereotype threat refers to the risk of confirming negative stereotypes about an individual’s racial, ethnic, gender, or cultural group which can create high cognitive load and reduce academic focus and performance.

What is an example of a negative stereotype?

Association with negative stereotypes For example, women are positively stereotyped as warm but negatively stereotyped as weak; Asian-Americans are positively stereotyped as competent but negatively stereotyped as cold; Black Americans are positively stereotyped as athletic but negatively stereotyped as unintelligent.

What does stereotype mean?

A stereotype is a mistaken idea or belief many people have about a thing or group that is based upon how they look on the outside, which may be untrue or only partly true. Stereotyping people is a type of prejudice because what is on the outside is a small part of who a person is.

How can we avoid stereotyping in the workplace?

Providing each and every employee with direct, helpful and personalized feedback avoids stereotyping as well as boosting employee engagement. Finally, accept feedback. The only way to know if you’re making progress is by asking, so listen to what your employees have to say.